Dating english sterling silver

dating english sterling silver

How do I Date my Silver from its hallmark?

To date your silver from its hallmark first identify the assay office (e.g. anchor for Birmingham, leopards head for London, etc.). Then click on the appropriate link below to go to the tables of date letters. If you are unable to identify the assay office from one of the town marks below you may have a piece of imported silver.

What is 925/1000 (sterling) silver?

The 925/1000 (sterling) silver fineness is certified in London and other British Assay Offices by the use of the lion passant mark. For a short period (1696-1720) the standard was elevated to 958.4/1000 and the Britannia mark replaced the lion passant.

How can I tell if I have imported silver?

If you are unable to identify the assay office from one of the town marks below you may have a piece of imported silver. Town marks for imported silver have differed from the normal marks since 1904. Illustrations of the various import marks are shown on the Import Markspage.

Why are there marks on electroplated silver?

The marks of electroplated silver were often inspired to the hallmarking used for sterling silver. The purpose of these marks hid the unacknowledged goal of confusing the customer about the nature of the metal alloy.

How do you read hallmarks on silver?

Knowing the history of silver flatware and other items can be very helpful for reading hallmarks. For example, if you see a duty mark on a piece, you’ll know that it was made between 1784 and 1890. You can narrow it down even more if you know when that mark was the king’s head and when it was the queen’s.

How do you identify antique silver?

In order to properly identify your antique silver pieces, you need to know how to read the hallmark on the item. These stamps indicate the year the item was made, where it was made, and who made it. It can also include a few other pieces, such as a duty mark, although that’s not always the case.

When did they start marking silver with hallmarks?

Pseudo-hallmarks were used about 1800. They were meant to mislead the public into believing that the silver was of English origin. Many unmarked pieces of American silver were made by 1825. The pieces were later marked with the store name.

What do the marks on the bottom of silver mean?

Silver Identification Guide January 1, 2020 The marks on the bottom of a piece of silver can be an indication of the age, maker, and origin of the piece. This mark is referred to as a “hallmark.”

What does electroplated nickel silver look like?

Note that electroplated nickel silver can often have a yellowish or gold-like sheen, as seen in this tankard and this 1848 Elkington teapot.

What is electroplated nickel silver (EPNS)?

The term Electroplated Nickel Silver (EPNS) refers to the coating of the base metal nickel silver—which in itself contains no actual silver—with precious metal. Usually, said precious metal, as the name suggests, is silver.

What does EPBM mean on silver plate?

Electro-Imperial in script over F.W. E.P.N.S. (Electroplated Nickel Silver) and EPBM (Electroplated Britannia Metal) are the most common names attributed to silver plate items. But many other names are used for silver plate:

What is the common name for silver plate?

John Round & Son Ltd - 1880c. E.P.N.S. (Electroplated Nickel Silver) and EPBM (Electroplated Britannia Metal) are the most common names attributed to silver plate items. But many other names are used for silver plate:

Related posts: